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J Hosp Infect. 2015 May;90(1):70-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jhin.2014.11.024. Epub 2015 Jan 13.

Investigating the impact of clinical anaesthetic practice on bacterial contamination of intravenous fluids and drugs.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK. Electronic address: nikunj.mahida@nuh.nhs.uk.
2
Department of Clinical Microbiology, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham, UK.
3
Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection Reference Unit, Public Health England, London, UK.
4
Anaesthesia and Critical Care, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

Abstract

Syringes (N = 426), ventilator machine swabs (N = 202) and intravenous (IV) fluid administration sets (N = 47) from 101 surgical cases were evaluated for bacterial contamination. Cultures from the external surface of syringe tips and syringe contents were positive in 46% and 15% of cases, respectively. The same bacterial species was cultured from both ventilator and syringe in 13% of cases, and was also detected in the IV fluid administration set in two cases. A significant association was found between emergency cases and contaminated syringes (odds ratio 4.5, 95% confidence interval 1.37-14.8; P = 0.01). Other risk factors included not using gloves and failure to cap syringes.

KEYWORDS:

Anaesthesia; Intravenous fluids; Surgery; Syringe

PMID:
25648939
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhin.2014.11.024
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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