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Mucosal Immunol. 2015 Sep;8(5):1110-7. doi: 10.1038/mi.2015.1. Epub 2015 Feb 4.

Higher levels of mucosal antibody to pneumococcal vaccine candidate proteins are associated with reduced acute otitis media caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae in young children.

Author information

1
Rochester General Hospital Research Institute, Rochester, New York, USA.
2
Legacy Pediatrics, Rochester, New York, USA.

Abstract

Mucosal immunity has a crucial role in controlling human respiratory tract infections. This study characterizes the naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to three Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn) protein antigens, pneumococcal histidine triad protein D (PhtD), pneumococcal choline binding protein A (PcpA), and pneumolysin (Ply), and assesses the association of the mucosal antibody levels with occurrence of acute otitis media (AOM) caused by Spn. Both nasopharyngeal (NP) immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA levels to all three proteins slightly decreased in children from 6 to 9 months of age and then gradually increased through 24 months of age. Spn NP colonization was associated with higher mucosal antibody levels to all three proteins. However, children with Spn AOM had 5-8-fold lower IgG and 3-6-fold lower IgA levels to the three proteins than children without AOM but asymptomatically colonized with Spn. Antigen-specific antibody levels in the middle ear fluid (MEF) were correlated with antibody levels in the NP. Children with AOM caused by Spn had lower antibody levels in both the MEF and NP than children with AOM caused by other pathogens. These results indicate that higher naturally acquired mucosal antibody levels to PhtD, PcpA and Ply are associated with reduced AOM caused by Spn.

PMID:
25648056
PMCID:
PMC4524797
DOI:
10.1038/mi.2015.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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