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Stem Cells Transl Med. 2015 Mar;4(3):295-307. doi: 10.5966/sctm.2014-0208. Epub 2015 Feb 2.

The lymph node as a new site for kidney organogenesis.

Author information

1
Department of Pathology, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Ri.MED Foundation, Palermo, Italy.
2
Department of Pathology, McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA; Ri.MED Foundation, Palermo, Italy Lagasse@pitt.edu.

Abstract

The shortage of organs for kidney transplantation has created the need to develop new strategies to restore renal structure and function. Given our recent finding that the lymph node (LN) can serve as an in vivo factory to generate or sustain complex structures like liver, pancreas, and thymus, we investigated whether it could also support kidney organogenesis from mouse renal embryonic tissue (metanephroi). Here we provide the first evidence that metanephroi acquired a mature phenotype upon injection into LN, and host cells likely contributed to this process. Urine-like fluid-containing cysts were observed in several grafts 12 weeks post-transplantation, indicating metanephroi transplants' ability to excrete products filtered from the blood. Importantly, the kidney graft adapted to a loss of host renal mass, speeding its development. Thus, the LN might provide a unique tool for studying the mechanisms of renal maturation, cell proliferation, and fluid secretion during cyst development. Moreover, we provide evidence that inside the LN, short-term cultured embryonic kidney cells stimulated with the Wnt agonist R-Spondin 2 gave rise to a monomorphic neuron-like cell population expressing the neuronal 200-kDa neurofilament heavy marker. This finding indicates that the LN might be used to validate the differentiation potential of candidate stem cells in regenerative nephrology.

KEYWORDS:

Bioreactor; Kidney; Lymph node; Organogenesis; Stem cells

PMID:
25646529
PMCID:
PMC4339853
DOI:
10.5966/sctm.2014-0208
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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