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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2015 Feb 17;112(7):2181-6. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1425007112. Epub 2015 Feb 2.

Generation of reactive oxygen species by lethal attacks from competing microbes.

Author information

1
Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases and Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4Z6; and tdong@ucalgary.ca john_mekalanos@hms.harvard.edu.
2
Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases and Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 4Z6; and.
3
Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 tdong@ucalgary.ca john_mekalanos@hms.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Whether antibiotics induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to cell death is an important yet controversial topic. Here, we report that lethal attacks from bacterial and viral species also result in ROS production in target cells. Using soxS as an ROS reporter, we found soxS was highly induced in Escherichia coli exposed to various forms of attacks mediated by the type VI secretion system (T6SS), P1vir phage, and polymyxin B. Using a fluorescence ROS probe, we found enhanced ROS levels correlate with induced soxS in E. coli expressing a toxic T6SS antibacterial effector and in E. coli treated with P1vir phage or polymyxin B. We conclude that both contact-dependent and contact-independent interactions with aggressive competing bacterial species and viruses can induce production of ROS in E. coli target cells.

KEYWORDS:

T6SS; antibiotics; interspecies competition; phage; reactive oxygen species

PMID:
25646446
PMCID:
PMC4343105
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1425007112
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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