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Transfusion. 2015 Jun;55(6):1178-85. doi: 10.1111/trf.12992. Epub 2015 Feb 2.

The heritability of hemolysis in stored human red blood cells.

Author information

1
Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Human Toxicology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa.
2
Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa.
3
Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa.
4
Metabolon, Inc., Durham, North Carolina.
5
Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.
6
Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa.
7
Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa.
8
Department of Pediatrics, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, Iowa.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) with maximum therapeutic efficacy is a major goal in transfusion medicine. One of the criteria used in determining stored RBC quality is end-of-storage hemolysis. Between donors, a wide range of hemolysis is observed under identical storage conditions. Here, a potential mechanism for this wide range is investigated. We hypothesize that the magnitude of hemolysis is a heritable trait. Also, we investigated correlations between hemolysis and RBC metabolites; this will establish pathways influencing hemolysis as future targets for genetic analysis.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS:

Units of RBCs from identical and nonidentical twins were collected and stored under standard conditions for 56 days. Hemolysis, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and total glutathione (tGSH) were measured throughout storage. Nontargeted metabolic analyses were performed on RBCs that had been stored for 28 days. Heritability was determined by comparing values between identical and nonidentical twins.

RESULTS:

Hemolysis was found to be heritable (mean > 45%) throughout the storage period. Potential correlations were observed between hemolysis and metabolites from the purine metabolism, lysolipid, and glycolysis pathways. These also exhibited heritability (>20%). No correlation was found with ATP or tGSH.

CONCLUSION:

The susceptibility of RBCs to lysis during storage is partly determined by inheritance. We have also uncovered several pathways that are candidate targets for future genomewide association studies. These findings will aid in the design of better storage solutions and the development of donor screening tools that minimize hemolysis during storage.

PMID:
25644965
PMCID:
PMC4469565
DOI:
10.1111/trf.12992
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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