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J Nutr. 2015 Feb;145(2):328-34. doi: 10.3945/jn.114.205229. Epub 2014 Dec 17.

Soft drink consumption is positively associated with increased waist circumference and 10-year incidence of abdominal obesity in Spanish adults.

Author information

1
Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group and CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) and Food and Nutrition PhD program, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain;
2
Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics, Research Program in Epidemiology and Public Health, Hospital del Mar Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain; CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) and.
3
Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group and Thao Foundation, Barcelona, Spain; and.
4
Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group and CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Carlos III Health Institute, Madrid, Spain;
5
Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Genetics, Research Program in Epidemiology and Public Health, Hospital del Mar Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain;
6
School of Medicine, Autonomous University of Mexico State, Toluca, Mexico.
7
Cardiovascular Risk and Nutrition Research Group and CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP) and hschroeder@imim.es.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The accumulation of abdominal fat increases risk of metabolic disorders and premature death. There is a dearth of prospective data on the association between caloric beverage consumption and surrogate markers of abdominal adiposity.

OBJECTIVE:

The aim of this study was to assess the relation between consumption of nonalcoholic caloric beverages, including soft drinks, fruit juice, whole milk, and skim and low-fat milk, and changes in waist circumference (WC) and odds of 10-y incidence of abdominal obesity.

METHODS:

We conducted a prospective, population-based study of 2181 Spanish men and women aged 25-74 y who were followed from 2000 to 2009. We measured weight, height, and WC, and recorded data on diet and leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) with the use of validated questionnaires. We fit multivariable linear and logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

A 100 kcal increase in soft drink consumption was associated with a 1.1 cm increase in WC (P = 0.018) after 10 y of follow-up. Substitution of 100 kcal of soft drinks with 100 kcal of whole milk or 100 kcal of juice was associated with a 1.3 cm (95% CI: 0.3, 2.4) and 1.1 cm (95% CI: 0.03, 2.2) decrease in WC, respectively. Increasing consumption of soft drinks from baseline to follow-up led to WC gain compared with maintaining nonconsumption. Greater soft drink consumption was positively associated (P = 0.029) with increased odds of 10-y incidence of abdominal obesity.

CONCLUSION:

Adults' consumption of soft drinks was associated with increased WC and odds of 10-y incidence of abdominal obesity. This association was moderate but consistent in all statistical models.

KEYWORDS:

Mediterranean diet; abdominal obesity; beverages; diet quality; soft drinks; waist circumference

PMID:
25644355
DOI:
10.3945/jn.114.205229
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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