Format

Send to

Choose Destination
BMC Int Health Hum Rights. 2015 Feb 3;15:1. doi: 10.1186/s12914-015-0041-3.

Steps on a journey to TB control in Solomon Islands: a cross-sectional, mixed methods pre-post evaluation of a local language DVD.

Author information

1
Hunter New England Population Health, 470 Peel St, Locked bag 9783, Tamworth, NEMSC, 2348, Australia. peter.massey@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au.
2
University of New England, Armidale, Australia. peter.massey@hnehealth.nsw.gov.au.
3
Atoifi Adventist Hospital, Malaita, Solomon Islands. rowenaasugeni@gmail.com.
4
James Cook University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. rowenaasugeni@gmail.com.
5
East Kwaio, Malaita, Solomon Islands. jwakageni@gmail.com.
6
East Kwaio, Malaita, Solomon Islands. esaukekeubata@gmail.com.
7
East Kwaio, Malaita, Solomon Islands. jmaenaadi@gmail.com.
8
East Kwaio, Malaita, Solomon Islands. jlaeteesafi@gmail.com.
9
Atoifi Adventist Hospital, Malaita, Solomon Islands. forestmanlaw@gmail.com.
10
James Cook University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. david.maclaren@jcu.edu.au.
11
James Cook University, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. rickspeare@gmail.com.
12
Tropical Health Solutions, Townsville, Australia. rickspeare@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

In Solomon Islands many people with Tuberculosis (TB) have challenges in accessing services because of socio-cultural, geographic and health service reasons, resulting in delays in TB treatment and low detection rates. The purpose of this project was to (i) develop a local language audio-visual resource (DVD) about TB (ii) share this resource with people in remote villages and (iii) evaluate the process and outcomes.

METHODS:

The project involved the development and evaluation of a DVD in local Kwaio language. The DVD included five short videos based on the Australian Respiratory Council TB Education Flipchart. The DVD also included short videos of: traditional music/chanting (ai'imae); drama that presented an allegory of TB; and a short documentary on the redevelopment of the local TB Ward. A mixed-methods approach evaluated changes in TB knowledge and investigated the impact of the DVD.

RESULTS:

The DVD was recorded and produced in March-June 2013 and screened in 41 villages and hamlets. The pre-post DVD survey was completed by 64% (255/400) of people who viewed the DVD in the villages. Pre-DVD survey responses showed a moderate to high knowledge about TB signs, symptoms and treatment but 76/255 (30%) stated TB was caused by sorcery and 85/255 (33%) incorrectly stated that TB medication should be stopped when a patient feels better. The post-DVD survey showed a significant increase in people in coastal villages reporting (i) a 3-week cough would trigger a medical assessment and (ii) TB is mainly spread through the air. Statements that TB is not caused by sorcery increased post-DVD in both coastal and mountain villages, however belief in sorcery in mountain villages remained high at 20/70 (29%).

CONCLUSIONS:

The local DVD resource was developed within local cultural understandings and oral traditions of Kwaio people. Using modern but accessible DVD technology generated a lot of interest about the disease and the stories. The project evaluation indicates that current delays in seeking treatment may be more due to socio-cultural and health service factors than awareness of the disease. Therefore the development of TB services, including TB education, which are culturally sensitive, remains important.

PMID:
25644087
PMCID:
PMC4320437
DOI:
10.1186/s12914-015-0041-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for BioMed Central Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center