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Stress Health. 2016 Oct;32(4):383-394. doi: 10.1002/smi.2632. Epub 2015 Jan 13.

Job Demands and Job Control as Predictors of Depressive Symptoms: Moderating Effects of Negative Childhood Socioemotional Experiences.

Author information

1
Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Finland. laura.pulkki-raback@helsinki.fi.
2
Institute of Behavioural Sciences, Unit of Personality, Work and Health Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland. laura.pulkki-raback@helsinki.fi.
3
Institute of Behavioural Sciences, Unit of Personality, Work and Health Psychology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
4
National Institute for Health and Welfare, University of Helsinki, Finland.
5
Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Finland.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
7
Faculty of Education, University of Oulu, Finland.
8
Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Finland.
9
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.
10
Department of Clinical Physiology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.

Abstract

There have been calls to know more about vulnerability factors that may predispose to adverse health outcomes at work. We examined if childhood adverse experiences would affect vulnerability to psychosocial stress factors at work. A nationally representative sample of 1546 Finnish men and women was followed up from childhood to adulthood. Childhood adverse experiences consisted of socioeconomic and emotional factors. Job demands and job control were measured 21 years later, and depressive symptoms were measured 21 and 27 years after the childhood measurements. Job demands predicted depressive symptoms over 6 years, and the association was modified by childhood emotional adversity. Participants with three or more emotional adversities in childhood had more depressive symptoms in response to high job demands compared with participants with zero or one emotional adversities in childhood (Betas = -1.40 and -2.01, ps < 0.05 and <0.01). No such moderating effect by childhood adverse experiences was found for the association between job control and depressive symptoms. Although modest in effect size, these findings provide a developmental viewpoint for understanding the role of childhood experiences in work-related stress factors. Such knowledge can enhance understanding of individual differences in vulnerability to the demands of working life.

KEYWORDS:

childhood adversity; depression; job demands; longitudinal study; vulnerability

PMID:
25641815
DOI:
10.1002/smi.2632
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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