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J Commun Disord. 2015 Mar-Apr;54:43-55. doi: 10.1016/j.jcomdis.2015.01.003. Epub 2015 Jan 21.

The contrast between cueing and/or observation in therapy for verb retrieval in post-stroke aphasia.

Author information

1
Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Québec, 2601, de la Canardière, Québec, Québec, Canada G1J 2G3; Université Laval, Pavillon Ferdinand-Vandry, bureau 4295, 1050, avenue de la Médecine, Québec, Québec, Canada G1V 0A6. Electronic address: sonia.routhier.1@ulaval.ca.
2
Centre de recherche de l'Institut Universitaire en Gériatrie de Montréal, 4545 chemin Queen-Mary, Montréal, Québec, Canada H3W 1W5. Electronic address: nathalie.bier@umontreal.ca.
3
Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire en santé mentale de Québec, 2601, de la Canardière, Québec, Québec, Canada G1J 2G3; Université Laval, Pavillon Ferdinand-Vandry, bureau 4295, 1050, avenue de la Médecine, Québec, Québec, Canada G1V 0A6. Electronic address: joel.macoir@rea.ulaval.ca.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies measuring treatment efficacy for post-stroke verb anomia are scarce. These studies mainly assessed the efficacy of three strategies: semantic, phonological and sensorimotor. Following these previous treatments, the performance of most participants improved on treated verbs, while improvement on untreated stimuli and tasks was inconsistent.

AIMS:

This study aimed to measure the effectiveness of a semantic-phonological strategy and a sensorimotor strategy for verb anomia in post-stroke aphasia.

METHODS:

A multiple baseline single-subject experimental study was conducted with two participants (9-37 years post-stroke). Four phases were completed: (1) background assessment, (2) baselines, (3) therapy, and (4) follow-up. Three equivalent lists of verbs were created for each participant and two of them were trained with a different strategy: action observation+semantic-phonological cues, action observation alone. The stimuli of the third list (control list) were not treated.

RESULTS:

The semantic-phonological cueing strategy led to a significant improvement. No improvement was observed after action observation. No generalization to untreated verbs was found.

CONCLUSIONS:

Verb naming can be enhanced by semantic/phonological cueing. In addition, other studies (clinical, neuroimaging, etc.) are needed to document the effect of action observation for the treatment of verb anomia.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

The reader will be able to (1) describe semantic-phonological therapies used in post-stroke verb anomia, (2) describe sensorimotor therapies used in post-stroke verb anomia, and (3) identify factors contributing to the efficacy of therapies to improve action naming in aphasia.

KEYWORDS:

Anomia; Aphasia; Gesture observation; Therapy; Verbs

PMID:
25638465
DOI:
10.1016/j.jcomdis.2015.01.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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