Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Patient Educ Couns. 2015 May;98(5):612-21. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2015.01.006. Epub 2015 Jan 20.

Behavior determinants among cardiac rehabilitation patients receiving educational interventions: an application of the health action process approach.

Author information

1
Exercise Sciences Department, Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Cardiac Rehabilitation and Prevention Program, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. Electronic address: gabriella.meloghisi@uhn.ca.
2
Cardiac Rehabilitation and Prevention Program, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada; School of Kinesiology and Health Science, York University, Toronto, Canada.
3
Exercise Sciences Department, Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
4
Cardiac Rehabilitation and Prevention Program, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To (1) test the effect of a health action process approach (HAPA) theory-based education program in cardiac rehabilitation (CR) compared to traditional education on patient knowledge and HAPA constructs; and, (2) investigate the theoretical correlates of exercise behavior among CR patients receiving theory-based education.

METHODS:

CR patients were exposed to an existing or HAPA-based 6 month education curriculum in this quasi-experimental study. Participants completed a survey assessing exercise behavior, HAPA constructs, and knowledge pre and post-program.

RESULTS:

306 patients consented to participate, of which 146 (47.7%) were exposed to the theory-based educational curriculum. There was a significant improvement in patients' overall knowledge pre- to post-CR, as well as in some HAPA constructs and exercise behavior, regardless of curriculum (p < 0.05). Path analysis revealed that knowledge was significantly related to intention formation, and intentions to engage in exercise were not directly related to behavior, which required action planning.

CONCLUSIONS:

The theoretically-informed education curriculum was not associated with greater knowledge or exercise behavior as expected. Education in CR improves knowledge, and theoretical constructs related to exercise behavior.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Educational curricula should be designed to not only increase patients' knowledge, but also enhance intentions, self-efficacy, and action planning.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiac rehabilitation; Health behavior theory; Knowledge; Patient education; Physical exercise

PMID:
25638305
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2015.01.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center