Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2015 Jan 31;107(3). pii: dju489. doi: 10.1093/jnci/dju489. Print 2015 Mar.

Age at cancer diagnosis for blacks compared with whites in the United States.

Author information

1
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (HAR, EAE, RMP, MSS).Current affiliation: HAR is currently affiliated with the Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. hilary.robbins@alumni.duke.edu.
2
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD (HAR, EAE, RMP, MSS).Current affiliation: HAR is currently affiliated with the Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Younger ages at diagnosis for blacks compared with whites have been reported for several cancer types. However, the US black population is younger than the white population, which may bias age comparisons that do not account for the populations at risk.

METHODS:

We analyzed Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data for non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites from 18 regions for the year 2010. We calculated crude mean ages at diagnosis among cases of 29 cancer types for whites and blacks. Separately, we calculated adjusted means that corrected for differences in population structure, which we obtained by fitting linear regression models to the ages at diagnosis with statistical weights specific to age and sex. Negative differences indicate younger ages in blacks, while positive differences indicate older ages in blacks. All statistical tests were two-sided.

RESULTS:

Based on crude means, blacks were diagnosed at younger ages than whites for nearly every cancer type. However, adjustment for population structure shifted the comparisons toward older ages among blacks, and only six statistically significant differences of three or more years remained. Blacks were younger than whites at diagnosis for Kaposi sarcoma (-10.2 years), male soft tissue cancer (-5.6), male anal cancer (-5.5), and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (-3.7), but older for cervical cancer (+4.7 years) and female thyroid cancer (+3.3). Smaller differences (<3 years) were present for female breast, female colon, lung, pancreas, prostate, and uterine corpus cancers (all P ≤ .001).

CONCLUSIONS:

Most differences between blacks and whites in the age at cancer diagnosis are small. Large differences for a few cancer types may be driven by etiologic and subtype heterogeneity as well as disparities in access to care.

PMID:
25638255
PMCID:
PMC4326308
DOI:
10.1093/jnci/dju489
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center