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AIDS Behav. 2015 Oct;19(10):1860-74. doi: 10.1007/s10461-015-1009-y.

Acceptability and preliminary efficacy of a tailored online HIV/STI testing intervention for young men who have sex with men: the Get Connected! program.

Author information

1
Center for Sexuality and Health Disparities, Department of Health Behavior & Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, SPH I Room 3822, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2029, USA. jbauerme@umich.edu.
2
Center for Sexuality and Health Disparities, Department of Health Behavior & Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, SPH I Room 3822, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2029, USA.
3
University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
4
National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO), Washington, DC, USA.
5
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Abstract

Southeast Michigan accounts for over 70 % of all HIV/STI cases in the state, with young men who have sex with men (YMSM) between the ages of 13 and 24 encumbering the largest burden in HIV/STI incidence. Using community-based participatory research principles, we developed and pilot tested a web-based, randomized control trial seeking to promote HIV/STI testing ("Get Connected!") among YMSM (N = 130; ages 15-24). Randomized participants completed a baseline assessment and shown a test-locator condition (control) or a tailored, personalized site (treatment). At 30-day follow-up, we found high acceptability among YMSM in both conditions, yet higher credibility of intervention content among YMSM in the treatment group (d = .55). Furthermore, 30 participants reported testing by following, with the majority of these participants (73.3 %; n = 22) completing the treatment condition, a clinically meaningful effect (d = .34) suggesting preliminary efficacy for the intervention. These results demonstrate the potential of the intervention, and suggest that a larger efficacy trial may be warranted.

KEYWORDS:

Linkage to care; Prevention; Youth; eHealth

PMID:
25638038
PMCID:
PMC4522230
DOI:
10.1007/s10461-015-1009-y
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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