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Breast Cancer Res. 2015 Jan 31;17:15. doi: 10.1186/s13058-015-0521-3.

Coffee and tea consumption and risk of pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort study.

Author information

1
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, P.O. Box 85500, 3508, GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands. ovenjjay@gmail.com.
2
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Julius Centre University of Malaya, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. ovenjjay@gmail.com.
3
National Clinical Research Centre, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Ministry of Health, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. ovenjjay@gmail.com.
4
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, P.O. Box 85500, 3508, GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands. p.h.m.peeters@umcutrecht.nl.
5
School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. p.h.m.peeters@umcutrecht.nl.
6
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, P.O. Box 85500, 3508, GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands. c.s.p.m.uiterwaal@umcutrecht.nl.
7
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Julius Centre University of Malaya, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. bas.bueno.de.mesquita@rivm.nl.
8
School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. bas.bueno.de.mesquita@rivm.nl.
9
National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. bas.bueno.de.mesquita@rivm.nl.
10
Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. bas.bueno.de.mesquita@rivm.nl.
11
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Julius Centre University of Malaya, University of Malaya, Lembah Pantai, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. awang@ummc.edu.my.
12
Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. bhb@soci.au.dk.
13
Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. ko@dce.au.dk.
14
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. annet@cancer.dk.
15
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark. anja@cancer.dk.
16
Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, "Nutrition, Hormones, and Women's Health" Team, Institut Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif, France. francoise.clavel@igr.fr.
17
Université Paris Sud 11, UMRS 1018, F-94807, Villejuif, France. francoise.clavel@igr.fr.
18
Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, "Nutrition, Hormones, and Women's Health" Team, Institut Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif, France. guy.fagherazzi@igr.fr.
19
Université Paris Sud 11, UMRS 1018, F-94807, Villejuif, France. guy.fagherazzi@igr.fr.
20
Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, "Nutrition, Hormones, and Women's Health" Team, Institut Gustave Roussy, F-94805, Villejuif, France. florence.perquier@igr.fr.
21
Université Paris Sud 11, UMRS 1018, F-94807, Villejuif, France. florence.perquier@igr.fr.
22
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. b.teucher@dkfz-heidelberg.de.
23
Department of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. r.kaaks@dkfz-heidelberg.de.
24
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Germany. m.schuetze@dife.de.
25
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Germany. boeing@dife.de.
26
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, WHO Collaborating Center for Food and Nutrition Policies, University of Athens Medical School, 75 M. Asias Avenue, Goudi, GR-115 27, Athens, Greece. pdlagiou@med.uoa.gr.
27
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, WHO Collaborating Center for Food and Nutrition Policies, University of Athens Medical School, 75 M. Asias Avenue, Goudi, GR-115 27, Athens, Greece. orfanos@nut.uoa.gr.
28
Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, WHO Collaborating Center for Food and Nutrition Policies, University of Athens Medical School, 75 M. Asias Avenue, Goudi, GR-115 27, Athens, Greece. atrichopoulou@hhf-greece.gr.
29
Hellenic Health Foundation, 10-12 Tetrapoleos Street, GR-115 27, Athens, Greece. atrichopoulou@hhf-greece.gr.
30
Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Via Venezian, 1, 20133, Milan, Italy. claudia.agnoli@istitutotumori.mi.it.
31
Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, University of Naples Federico II, Via Pansini, 5 80131, Naples, Italy. amattiel@unina.it.
32
Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy. d.palli@ispo.toscana.it.
33
Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civile - M.P.Arezzo" Hospital, ASP 7, Ragusa, Italy. rtumino@tin.it.
34
HuGeF Foundation and CPO-Piemonte, Torino, Italy. carlotta.sacerdote@cpo.it.
35
National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. franzel.van.duijnhoven@rivm.nl.
36
Division of Human Nutrition, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands. franzel.van.duijnhoven@rivm.nl.
37
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. tonje.braaten@uit.no.
38
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. eiliv.lund@uit.no.
39
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. guri.skeie@uit.no.
40
Public Health and Participation Directorate, Health and Health Care Services Council, Asturias, Spain. marialuisa.redondocornejo@asturias.org.
41
Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. gbuckland@iconcologia.net.
42
Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (Granada.ibs), Granada, Spain. mariajose.sanchez.easp@juntadeandalucia.es.
43
Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. mariajose.sanchez.easp@juntadeandalucia.es.
44
Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. mdolores.chirlaque@carm.es.
45
Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Health Council, Murcia, Spain. mdolores.chirlaque@carm.es.
46
Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. me.ardanaz.aicua@cfnavarra.es.
47
Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. me.ardanaz.aicua@cfnavarra.es.
48
Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública-CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. epicss-san@ej-gv.es.
49
Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Instituto Investigación Sanitaria, San Sebastian, Spain. epicss-san@ej-gv.es.
50
Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö/Nutrition Epidemiology, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. elisabet.wirfalt@med.lu.se.
51
Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö/Nutrition Epidemiology, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. peter.wallstrom@med.lu.se.
52
Department of Odontology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ingegerd.johansson@odont.umu.se.
53
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Nutritional Research, Umeå University, Umea, Sweden. lena.nilsson@nutrires.umu.se.
54
University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK. kk101@medschl.cam.ac.uk.
55
Medical Research Council, Epidemiology Unit, Cambridge, UK. nick.wareham@mrc-epid.cam.ac.uk.
56
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7LF, UK. naomi.allen@ctsu.ox.ac.uk.
57
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Richard Doll Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7LF, UK. tim.key@ceu.ox.ac.uk.
58
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. rinaldi@iarc.fr.
59
International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. iromieu@gmail.com.
60
School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. v.gallo@imperial.ac.uk.
61
Centre for Primary Care and Public Health, Barts and The London School of Medicine, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. v.gallo@imperial.ac.uk.
62
School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. e.riboli@imperial.ac.uk.
63
Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, P.O. Box 85500, 3508, GA, Utrecht, The Netherlands. c.vangils@umcutrecht.nl.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Specific coffee subtypes and tea may impact risk of pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer differently. We investigated the association between coffee (total, caffeinated, decaffeinated) and tea intake and risk of breast cancer.

METHODS:

A total of 335,060 women participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) Study, completed a dietary questionnaire from 1992 to 2000, and were followed-up until 2010 for incidence of breast cancer. Hazard ratios (HR) of breast cancer by country-specific, as well as cohort-wide categories of beverage intake were estimated.

RESULTS:

During an average follow-up of 11 years, 1064 premenopausal, and 9134 postmenopausal breast cancers were diagnosed. Caffeinated coffee intake was associated with lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer: adjusted HR=0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82 to 0.98, for high versus low consumption; Ptrend=0.029. While there was no significant effect modification by hormone receptor status (P=0.711), linear trend for lower risk of breast cancer with increasing caffeinated coffee intake was clearest for estrogen and progesterone receptor negative (ER-PR-), postmenopausal breast cancer (P=0.008). For every 100 ml increase in caffeinated coffee intake, the risk of ER-PR- breast cancer was lower by 4% (adjusted HR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93 to 1.00). Non-consumers of decaffeinated coffee had lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer (adjusted HR=0.89; 95% CI: 0.80 to 0.99) compared to low consumers, without evidence of dose-response relationship (Ptrend=0.128). Exclusive decaffeinated coffee consumption was not related to postmenopausal breast cancer risk, compared to any decaffeinated-low caffeinated intake (adjusted HR=0.97; 95% CI: 0.82 to 1.14), or to no intake of any coffee (HR: 0.96; 95%: 0.82 to 1.14). Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee were not associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Tea intake was neither associated with pre- nor post-menopausal breast cancer.

CONCLUSIONS:

Higher caffeinated coffee intake may be associated with lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Decaffeinated coffee intake does not seem to be associated with breast cancer.

PMID:
25637171
PMCID:
PMC4349221
DOI:
10.1186/s13058-015-0521-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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