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Matrix Biol. 2015 May-Jul;44-46:77-85. doi: 10.1016/j.matbio.2015.01.013. Epub 2015 Jan 28.

ADAMTS proteases and cancer.

Author information

1
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, IUOPA, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias, Spain. Electronic address: santical@uniovi.es.
2
Departamento de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular, Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, IUOPA, Universidad de Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Asturias, Spain.

Abstract

ADAMTSs (A disintegrin and metalloprotease domains with thrombospondins motifs) are complex extracellular proteases that have been related to both oncogenic and tumor-protective functions. These enzymes can be secreted by cancer and stromal cells and may contribute to modify the tumor microenvironment by multiple mechanisms. Thus, ADAMTSs can cleave or interact with a wide range of extracellular matrix components or regulatory factors, and therefore affect cell adhesion, migration, proliferation and angiogenesis. The balance of protumor versus antitumor effects of ADAMTSs may depend on the nature of their substrates or interacting-partners upon secretion from the cell. Moreover, different ADAMTS genes have been found overexpressed, mutated or epigenetically silenced in tumors from different origins, suggesting the direct impact of these metalloproteases in cancer development. However, despite the important advances on the tumor biology of ADAMTSs in recent years, more mechanistic and functional studies are necessary to fully understand how these proteases can influence tumor microenvironment to potentiate cancer growth or to induce tumor regression. This review outlines current and emerging connections between ADAMTSs and cancer.

KEYWORDS:

Disintegrin; Metalloprotease; Thrombospondin; Tumor microenvironment; Tumorigenesis

PMID:
25636539
DOI:
10.1016/j.matbio.2015.01.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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