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Curr Opin Nephrol Hypertens. 2015 Mar;24(2):131-8. doi: 10.1097/MNH.0000000000000105.

Pathogenesis of preeclampsia.

Author information

1
aMassachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School bBeth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Preeclampsia is a gestational kidney disease characterized by glomerular endothelial injury, leading to maternal hypertension and proteinuria. If not addressed promptly, there is significant maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. When severe, this disorder can cause hepatic and neurologic dysfunction. Understandably, this placental disease enters the focus of the obstetrician first; however, with progression, the nephrologist can also be enlisted. Typical complications include acute kidney injury, refractory hypertension, and acute pulmonary edema. This review summarizes recent literature on the pathogenesis of this condition and will highlight new diagnostic and therapeutic options for preeclampsia.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Over the past decade, the role of soluble vascular factors in preeclampsia has shed light on the mechanism underlying this disease. During the last 2 years, several new therapeutics have been developed that target implicated circulating angiogenic factors, including soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1, an endogenous vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor. Serum levels of angiogenic factors have been correlated with a constellation of hemodynamic and pathophysiologic changes. Thus, circulating levels of these factors may serve both diagnostic and prognostic purposes.

SUMMARY:

Overall, our understanding of preeclampsia has developed significantly and the future holds promise for mechanism-based novel diagnostics and therapeutics.

PMID:
25636145
DOI:
10.1097/MNH.0000000000000105
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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