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J Hepatol. 2015 May;62(5):1061-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jhep.2014.12.005. Epub 2015 Jan 26.

Alcohol drinking pattern and risk of alcoholic liver cirrhosis: a prospective cohort study.

Author information

1
Department of Hepatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen DK-2100, Denmark; National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen DK-1353, Denmark. Electronic address: gask@dadlnet.dk.
2
National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Copenhagen DK-1353, Denmark.
3
Department of Hepatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen DK-2100, Denmark.
4
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen DK-2100, Denmark.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Alcohol is the main contributing factor of alcoholic cirrhosis, but less is known about the significance of drinking pattern.

METHODS:

We investigated the risk of alcoholic cirrhosis among 55,917 participants (aged 50-64 years) in the Danish Cancer, Diet, and Health study (1993-2011). Baseline information on alcohol intake, drinking pattern, and confounders was obtained from a questionnaire. Follow-up information came from national registers. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) for alcoholic cirrhosis in relation to drinking frequency, lifetime alcohol amount, and beverage type.

RESULTS:

We observed 257 and 85 incident cases of alcoholic cirrhosis among men and women, respectively, none among lifetime abstainers. In men, HR for alcoholic cirrhosis among daily drinkers was 3.65 (95% CI: 2.39; 5.55) compared to drinking 2-4 days/week. Alcohol amount in recent age periods (40-49 and 50-59 years) was associated with an increased risk, whereas the amount in 20-29 and 30-39 years was not. In men drinking 14-28 drinks/week, HR was 7.47 (95% CI: 1.68; 33.12), 3.12 (95% CI: 1.53; 6.39), and 1.69 (95% CI: 0.79; 3.65) in drinkers of little (<1% of weekly amount), some (1-15%), and mostly wine (50-100%), compared to drinking <14 drinks/week. In general, results were similar for women.

CONCLUSIONS:

In men, daily drinking was associated with an increased risk of alcoholic cirrhosis. Recent alcohol consumption rather than earlier in life was associated with risk of alcoholic cirrhosis. Compared to beer and liquor, wine might be associated with a lower risk of alcoholic cirrhosis.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol; Alcoholic beverages; Cohort study; Drinking pattern; Epidemiological methods; Liver cirrhosis

PMID:
25634330
DOI:
10.1016/j.jhep.2014.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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