Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Exp Eye Res. 2015 Mar;132:231-9. doi: 10.1016/j.exer.2015.01.021. Epub 2015 Jan 26.

Thermal analysis of dry eye subjects and the thermal impulse perturbation model of ocular surface.

Author information

1
University of Rochester Flaum Eye Institute, Ocular Surface Laboratory, Rochester, NY, USA; Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA.
2
School of Mathematical Sciences, Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY, USA.
3
University of Rochester Flaum Eye Institute, Ocular Surface Laboratory, Rochester, NY, USA.
4
University of Rochester Flaum Eye Institute, Ocular Surface Laboratory, Rochester, NY, USA; Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, USA. Electronic address: james.zavislan@rochester.edu.

Abstract

In this study, we explore the usage of ocular surface temperature (OST) decay patterns to distinguished between dry eye patients with aqueous deficient dry eye (ADDE) and meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). The OST profiles of 20 dry eye subjects were measured by a long-wave infrared thermal camera in a standardized environment (24 °C, and relative humidity (RH) 40%). The subjects were instructed to blink every 5 s after 20 ∼ 25 min acclimation. Exponential decay curves were fit to the average temperature within a region of the central cornea. We find the MGD subjects have both a higher initial temperature (p < 0.022) and a higher asymptotic temperature (p < 0.007) than the ADDE subjects. We hypothesize the temperature difference among the subpopulations is due to tear volume and heat transfer mechanisms. To study the validity of our claim, we develop a mathematical model, referred to as the thermal impulse perturbation (TIP) model. We conclude that long-wave-infrared thermal imaging is a plausible tool in assisting with the classification of dry eye patient.

KEYWORDS:

Aqueous deficient dry eye (ADDE); Dry eye; Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD); Ocular surface temperature (OST); Thermal imaging; Thermal impulse perturbation model

PMID:
25633347
DOI:
10.1016/j.exer.2015.01.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center