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Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol. 2015 Feb;36(2):169-79. doi: 10.1017/ice.2014.22.

Triclosan-coated sutures reduce the risk of surgical site infections: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Author information

1
1Division of Infectious Diseases,Thammasat University Hospital,Pratumthani,Thailand12120.
2
2Division of Infectious Diseases,Children's National Medical Center,Department of Pediatrics,Epidemiology and Global Health,George Washington University,School of Medicine and Health Sciences,School of Public Health,Washington DC20010.
3
3College of Allied Medical Professions,University of the Philippines-Manila,Pedro Gil St,Ermita,Manila,Philippines1000.
4
4College of Public Health,University of the Philippines-Manila,Pedro Gil St,Ermita,Manila,Philippines1000.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To analyze available evidence on the effectiveness of triclosan-coated sutures (TCSs) in reducing the risk of surgical site infection (SSI). DESIGN Systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS A systematic search of both randomized (RCTs) and nonrandomized (non-RCT) studies was performed on PubMed Medline, OVID, EMBASE, and SCOPUS, without restrictions in language and publication type. Random-effects models were utilized and pooled estimates were reported as the relative risk (RR) ratio with 95% confidence interval (CI). Tests for heterogeneity as well as meta-regression, subgroup, and sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS A total of 29 studies (22 RCTs, 7 non-RCTs) were included in the meta-analysis. The overall RR of acquiring an SSI was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.55-0.77; I2=42.4%, P=.01) in favor of TCS use. The pooled RR was particularly lower for the abdominal surgery group (RR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.41-0.77) and was robust to sensitivity analysis. Meta-regression analysis revealed that study design, in part, may explain heterogeneity (P=.03). The pooled RR subgroup meta-analyses for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs were 0.74 (95% CI: 0.61-0.89) and 0.53 (95% CI: 0.42-0.66), respectively, both of which favored the use of TCSs. CONCLUSION The random-effects meta-analysis based on RCTs suggests that TCSs reduced the risk of SSI by 26% among patients undergoing surgery. This effect was particularly evident among those who underwent abdominal surgery.

PMID:
25632999
DOI:
10.1017/ice.2014.22
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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