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J Dev Orig Health Dis. 2015 Apr;6(2):65-78. doi: 10.1017/S204017441500001X. Epub 2015 Jan 29.

Metabolomics in the developmental origins of obesity and its cardiometabolic consequences.

Author information

1
1Obesity Prevention Program,Department of Population Medicine,Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute,Boston,MA,USA.
2
3Metabolon Inc.,West Sacramento,CA,USA.
3
4Nutrition and Metabolism Center,Duke University of Medicine,Durham,NC,USA.
4
5The Irish Center for Fetal and Neonatal Translational Research,University College Cork,Co. Cork,USA.
5
6Departments of Neurosurgery,Brigham & Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School,Boston,MA,USA.
6
7Research Division,Joslin Diabetes Center,Boston,MA,USA.
7
8Department of Medicine,Channing Division of Network Medicine and Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care,Brigham and Women's Hospital,Boston,MA,USA.

Abstract

In this review, we discuss the potential role of metabolomics to enhance understanding of obesity-related developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD). We first provide an overview of common techniques and analytical approaches to help interested investigators dive into this relatively novel field. Next, we describe how metabolomics may capture exposures that are notoriously difficult to quantify, and help to further refine phenotypes associated with excess adiposity and related metabolic sequelae over the life course. Together, these data can ultimately help to elucidate mechanisms that underlie fetal metabolic programming. Finally, we review current gaps in knowledge and identify areas where the field of metabolomics is likely to provide insights into mechanisms linked to DOHaD in human populations.

KEYWORDS:

obesity

PMID:
25631626
PMCID:
PMC4406410
DOI:
10.1017/S204017441500001X
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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