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Front Physiol. 2015 Jan 12;5:526. doi: 10.3389/fphys.2014.00526. eCollection 2014.

Acute post-exercise change in blood pressure and exercise training response in patients with coronary artery disease.

Author information

1
Department of Exercise and Medical Physiology, Verve Research Oulu, Finland ; Medical Research Center, University of Oulu, Oulu University Hospital Oulu, Finland.
2
Department of Exercise and Medical Physiology, Verve Research Oulu, Finland.
3
Medical Research Center, University of Oulu, Oulu University Hospital Oulu, Finland.
4
Department of Exercise and Medical Physiology, Verve Research Oulu, Finland ; Department of Applied Sciences, London South Bank University London, UK.

Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that acute post-exercise change in blood pressure (BP) may predict exercise training responses in BP in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients with CAD (n = 116, age 62 ± 5 years, 85 men) underwent BP assessments at rest and during 10-min recovery following a symptom-limited exercise test before and after the 6-month training intervention (one strength and 3-4 aerobic moderate-intensity exercises weekly). Post-exercise change in systolic BP (SBP) was calculated by subtracting resting SBP from lowest post-exercise SBP. The training-induced change in resting SBP was -2 ± 13 mmHg (p = 0.064), ranging from -42 to 35 mmHg. Larger post-exercise decrease in SBP and baseline resting SBP predicted a larger training-induced decrement in SBP (β = 0.46 and β = -0.44, respectively, p < 0.001 for both). Acute post-exercise decrease in SBP provided additive value to baseline resting SBP in the prediction of training-induced change in resting SBP (R(2) from 0.20 to 0.26, p = 0.002). After further adjustments for other potential confounders (sex, age, baseline body mass index, realized training load), post-exercise decrease in SBP still predicted the training response in resting SBP (β = 0.26, p = 0.015). Acute post-exercise change in SBP was associated with training-induced change in resting SBP in patients with CAD, providing significant predictive information beyond baseline resting SBP.

KEYWORDS:

acute exercise; arterial pressure; autonomic function; exercise testing; hypertension; ischemic heart disease; training adaptation

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