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Matern Child Health J. 2015 Jul;19(7):1616-23. doi: 10.1007/s10995-015-1672-7.

The relationship between planned and reported home infant sleep locations among mothers of late preterm and term infants.

Author information

  • 1Center for Developmental Science, Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 100 East Franklin Street, Suite 200, Campus Building 8115, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA, kristin.tully@unc.edu.

Abstract

To compare maternal report of planned and practiced home sleep locations of infants born late preterm (34 0/7 to 36 6/7 gestational weeks) with those infants born term (≥37 0/7 gestational weeks) over the first postpartum month. Open-ended semi-structured maternal interviews were conducted in a US hospital following birth and by phone at 1 month postpartum during 2010-2012. Participants were 56 mother-infant dyads: 26 late preterm and 30 term. Most women planned to room share at home with their infants and reported doing so for some or all of the first postpartum month. More women reported bed sharing during the first postpartum month than had planned to do so in both the late preterm and term groups. The primary reason for unplanned bed sharing was to soothe nighttime infant fussiness. Those participants who avoided bed sharing at home commonly discussed their fear for infant safety. A few parents reported their infants were sleeping propped on pillows and co-sleeping on a recliner. Some women in both the late preterm and term groups reported lack of opportunity to obtain a bassinet prior to childbirth. The discrepancy between plans for infant sleep location at home and maternally reported practices were similar in late preterm and term groups. Close maternal proximity to their infants at night was derived from the need to assess infant well-being, caring for infants, and women's preferences. Bed sharing concerns related to infant safety and the establishment of an undesirable habit, and alternative arrangements included shared recliner sleep.

PMID:
25626714
PMCID:
PMC4620554
DOI:
10.1007/s10995-015-1672-7
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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