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PLoS Genet. 2015 Jan 26;11(1):e1004852. doi: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004852. eCollection 2015 Jan.

No evidence for association of autism with rare heterozygous point mutations in Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2), or in Other Contactin-Associated Proteins or Contactins.

Author information

1
Yale University Department of Genetics, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
2
Yale University Child Study Center, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America; Yale University Department of Pediatrics, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
3
Yale University Department of Genetics, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America; University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
4
University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, California, United States of America.
5
Yale College, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
6
Yale University Child Study Center, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America.
7
UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.
8
UCLA School of Law, Los Angeles, California, United States of America.
9
Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States of America; Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States of America.
10
Yale University Department of Genetics, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America; Yale University Child Study Center, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America; University of California, San Francisco, Department of Psychiatry, San Francisco, California, United States of America.

Abstract

Contactins and Contactin-Associated Proteins, and Contactin-Associated Protein-Like 2 (CNTNAP2) in particular, have been widely cited as autism risk genes based on findings from homozygosity mapping, molecular cytogenetics, copy number variation analyses, and both common and rare single nucleotide association studies. However, data specifically with regard to the contribution of heterozygous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) have been inconsistent. In an effort to clarify the role of rare point mutations in CNTNAP2 and related gene families, we have conducted targeted next-generation sequencing and evaluated existing sequence data in cohorts totaling 2704 cases and 2747 controls. We find no evidence for statistically significant association of rare heterozygous mutations in any of the CNTN or CNTNAP genes, including CNTNAP2, placing marked limits on the scale of their plausible contribution to risk.

PMID:
25621974
PMCID:
PMC4306541
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pgen.1004852
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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