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J Tissue Eng Regen Med. 2016 Sep;10(9):715-38. doi: 10.1002/term.1978. Epub 2015 Jan 26.

A review of key challenges of electrospun scaffolds for tissue-engineering applications.

Author information

1
Biomedical Engineering Faculty, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran, Iran.
2
Biomedical Engineering Faculty, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran, Iran. atefeh.solouk@aut.ac.ir.
3
Polymer Engineering Faculty, Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran, Iran.
4
Amirkabir Nanotechnology Research Institute (ANTRI), Amirkabir University of Technology (Tehran Polytechnic), Tehran, Iran.
5
Novel Materials and Nanotechnology Group, IATA-CSIC, Avda Agustı'n Escardino 7, 46980, Burjassot, Spain.
6
Department of Biomaterials Science and Technology, University of Twente, Enschede, The Netherlands.
7
Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, Singapore.

Abstract

Tissue engineering holds great promise to develop functional constructs resembling the structural organization of native tissues to improve or replace biological functions, with the ultimate goal of avoiding organ transplantation. In tissue engineering, cells are often seeded into artificial structures capable of supporting three-dimensional (3D) tissue formation. An optimal scaffold for tissue-engineering applications should mimic the mechanical and functional properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) of those tissues to be regenerated. Amongst the various scaffolding techniques, electrospinning is an outstanding one which is capable of producing non-woven fibrous structures with dimensional constituents similar to those of ECM fibres. In recent years, electrospinning has gained widespread interest as a potential tissue-engineering scaffolding technique and has been discussed in detail in many studies. So why this review? Apart from their clear advantages and extensive use, electrospun scaffolds encounter some practical limitations, such as scarce cell infiltration and inadequate mechanical strength for load-bearing applications. A number of solutions have been offered by different research groups to overcome the above-mentioned limitations. In this review, we provide an overview of the limitations of electrospinning as a tissue-engineered scaffolding technique, with emphasis on possible resolutions of those issues.

KEYWORDS:

cell infiltration; electrospinning; mechanical strength; tissue engineering

PMID:
25619820
DOI:
10.1002/term.1978
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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