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Nutr Hosp. 2014 Sep 28;31(2):751-8. doi: 10.3305/nh.2015.31.2.8056.

Nutritional and metabolic status of breast cancer women.

Author information

1
Food Science Post-Graduation Program, Pharmacy School, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais.. tatianabering@yahoo.com.br.
2
Food Science Post-Graduation Program, Pharmacy School, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Alfa Institute of Gastroenterology, Hospital of Clinics, Medical School. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Brazil.. tatianabering@yahoo.com.br.

Abstract

in English, Spanish

INTRODUCTION:

The nutritional and metabolic status have been related to cancer risk factors as well as to cancer treatment morbimortality. Thus, its assessment is important for developing strategies for the promotion, maintenance and / or recovery of nutritional status and cancer outcome.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Several different methods for nutritional assessment in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant therapy were used, including subjective global assessment (SGA), body mass index (BMI), triceps skinfold (TSF), mid-arm circumference (MAC), adductor pollicis muscle thickness (APMT), hand grip strength (HGS) and bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). The presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) was also evaluated. The occurrence of complications during cancer treatment versus the nutritional status was assessed.

RESULTS:

We followed 78 women with a mean age of 53.2 } 11.6 years. Most patients were considered well nourished (80.8%). Excessive body fat mass by BIA and MetS were found in 80,8 % and 41.9% of the patients respectively. There were significant differences in BMI, TSF, WC (waist circumference) and % fat mass between patients with and without MetS. Most patients experienced complications during cancer treatment, but there was no association with nutritional or metabolic status.

CONCLUSION:

In breast cancer women undergoing adjuvant therapy, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was high and, on the contrary, undernutrition was low. There were no short-term effects of metabolic syndrome or undernutrition on clinical outcomes.

PMID:
25617559
DOI:
10.3305/nh.2015.31.2.8056
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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