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Healthc Policy. 2014 Nov;10(2):38-51.

Choosing your partner for the PROM: a review of evidence on patient-reported outcome measures for use in primary and community care.

Author information

1
Director, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Professor, School of Population & Public Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.
2
Post-Doctoral Fellow, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, BC.
3
Librarian, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Vancouver, BC.
4
President, Access Consulting Ltd, Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Saskatoon, SK.
5
Assistant Professor, School of Population & Public Health, The University of British Columbia, Associate Director, Centre for Health Service & Policy Research, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC.
6
Associate, Centre for Clinical Epidemiology & Evaluation, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Family Practice, The University of British Columbia, Associate, Centre for Health Service & Policy Research, The University of British Columbia.
7
Research Consultant, Balfour, BC; and Rick Sawatzky, PhD, Associate Professor, School of Nursing, Trinity Western University, Scientist, Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences, Providence Healthcare, Langley, BC.

Abstract

Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are assessments of health status from the patient's perspective. The systematic and routine collection and use of PROMs in healthcare settings adds value in several ways, including quality improvement and service evaluation. We address the issue of instrument selection for use in primary and/or community settings. Specifically, from the large number of available PROMs, which instrument delivers the highest level of performance and validity? For selected generic PROMs, we reviewed literature on psychometric properties and other instrument features (e.g., health domains captured). Briefly we summarize key strengths of the three PROMs that received the most favourable psycho-metric and overall evaluation. The Short-Form 36 has a number of strengths, chiefly, its strong psychometric properties such as responsiveness. The PROMIS/Global Health Scale scored highly on most criteria and warrants serious consideration, especially as it is free to use. The EQ-5D scored satisfactorily on many criteria and, beneficially, it has a low response burden.

PMID:
25617514
PMCID:
PMC4748356
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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