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J Spinal Cord Med. 2016;39(1):99-102. doi: 10.1179/2045772314Y.0000000293. Epub 2015 Jan 23.

Effects of once weekly NMES training on knee extensors fatigue and body composition in a person with spinal cord injury.

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Single-subject case (male, 33 years of age, T6 SCI AIS A).

OBJECTIVES:

To determine the effect of surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) training conducted once weekly on improving fatigue resistance as well as regional and whole body composition in an individual with spinal cord injury (SCI).

SETTING:

Laboratory setting within a SCI Center.

METHODS:

Surface NMES resistance training (RT) of the paralyzed knee extensors was conducted once weekly for 12 weeks using ankle weights. Knee extensor fatigue index was determined by the number of repetitions (reps) achieved out of 30 reps. Total and regional body composition including percentage body fat (%BF), fat mass (FM), lean mass (LM) were conducted before the first session and one week after the last training session using whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

RESULTS:

The participant had a compliance rate of 83% and he was able to lift 6 and 2 lbs on the right and left legs, respectively. Right knee extensors showed greater fatigue resistance compared to the left one. Leg LM increased by 6% accompanied with decrease in arm, trunk and total body LM by -4.7%, -13%, -5%, respectively. The %BF increased by 8%, 7.3%, 15.5%, 11.5% for arm, legs, trunk and total body.

CONCLUSION:

Once weekly of NMES RT evokes local positive changes in leg LM without reciprocating the continuous loss in LM or gain in FM in other regions and total body. Training was effective in increasing strength as well as fatigue resistance of the trained knee extensors.

KEYWORDS:

Body composition; Exercise; Neuromuscular electrical stimulation; Resistance training; Spinal cord injuries

PMID:
25615403
PMCID:
PMC4725798
DOI:
10.1179/2045772314Y.0000000293
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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