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Prosthet Orthot Int. 2015 Feb;39(1):40-7. doi: 10.1177/0309364614535233.

Pedorthic management of the diabetic foot.

Author information

1
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA National Pedorthic Services, Inc., Milwaukee, WI, USA npsns_dennis@live.com.
2
Orthotic and Prosthetic Design, Inc., St. Louis, MO, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Conservative pedorthic management of the diabetic foot has been shown to be an effective method to prevent ulcers, amputations, and re-amputations. This article exhibits why and how pedorthics plays such an important role via modalities such as footwear, shoe modifications, custom foot orthoses, and partial foot prostheses.

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this article is to demonstrate how pedorthics has been shown to be an integral part of conservative diabetic foot care. The authors' goal was to educate the reader about the different modalities that are available for use.

STUDY DESIGN:

This article is based largely on review of previously published research and scholarly articles, augmented by the more than 60 years of pedorthic and orthotic clinical experience of the authors.

METHODS:

Approximately 60 journal articles and book chapters were reviewed by the authors. Articles were located via online resources such as PubMed as well as the authors' own libraries.

RESULTS:

It was repeatedly noted that pedorthic modalities such as shoes, foot orthoses, and shoe modifications may be utilized in the treatment and prevention of diabetic foot wounds and other complications.

CONCLUSION:

Pedorthic devices may be successfully integrated into a comprehensive treatment plan for patients with diabetes and foot ulcers.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

This information is of special interest to those who treat patients with diabetes. The article demonstrates the efficacy of pedorthic intervention through the compilation and review of relevant previously published data.

KEYWORDS:

The diabetic foot; diabetes; lower limb orthotics; orthotics; skin stress

PMID:
25614500
DOI:
10.1177/0309364614535233
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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