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J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2015 May-Jun;22(4):663-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jmig.2015.01.008. Epub 2015 Jan 19.

Coxalgia? Call the gynecologist.

Author information

1
Unit of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IRCCS-Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia, Italy. Electronic address: dariomandato@virgilio.it.
2
Unit of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IRCCS-Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
3
Unit of Pathology, IRCCS-Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
4
Unit of Radiology, IRCCS-Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia, Italy.
5
Unit of Obstetrics and Gynecology, IRCCS-Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Reggio Emilia, Italy; Unit of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia, Italy.

Abstract

Cellular angiofibroma is a rare mesenchymal tumor that usually affects the vulvar region. It is commonly asymptomatic and treated with radical excision. We describe the first case of cellular angiofibroma located in the retroperitoneum presenting with coxalgia and laparoscopically treated. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient was coxalgia and disease free. Coxalgia is an unusual symptom for gynecologists; nevertheless, it is possible that several neoplasms may originate in the female pelvis, so any symptom requires careful evaluation. The laparoscopic approach may be effective in removing cellular angiofibroma, avoiding injuries to surrounding structures and unesthetic scarring and leading to a faster recovery.

KEYWORDS:

Cellular angiofibroma; Coxalgia; Laparoscopy; Mesenchymal tumor; Paravesical space

PMID:
25614345
DOI:
10.1016/j.jmig.2015.01.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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