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Science. 2015 Jan 23;347(6220):1260419. doi: 10.1126/science.1260419.

Proteomics. Tissue-based map of the human proteome.

Author information

1
Science for Life Laboratory, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Proteomics, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden. Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2970 Hørsholm, Denmark. mathias.uhlen@scilifelab.se.
2
Science for Life Laboratory, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden.
3
Science for Life Laboratory, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Proteomics, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
4
Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden·
5
Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.
6
Science for Life Laboratory, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-171 21 Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Science for Life Laboratory, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden·
7
Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors (IfADo) at Dortmund TU, D-44139 Dortmund, Germany.
8
Lab Surgpath, Mumbai, India.
9
Department of Proteomics, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
10
Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
11
Center for Biomembrane Research, Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
12
Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2970 Hørsholm, Denmark. Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg, Sweden.

Abstract

Resolving the molecular details of proteome variation in the different tissues and organs of the human body will greatly increase our knowledge of human biology and disease. Here, we present a map of the human tissue proteome based on an integrated omics approach that involves quantitative transcriptomics at the tissue and organ level, combined with tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry, to achieve spatial localization of proteins down to the single-cell level. Our tissue-based analysis detected more than 90% of the putative protein-coding genes. We used this approach to explore the human secretome, the membrane proteome, the druggable proteome, the cancer proteome, and the metabolic functions in 32 different tissues and organs. All the data are integrated in an interactive Web-based database that allows exploration of individual proteins, as well as navigation of global expression patterns, in all major tissues and organs in the human body.

PMID:
25613900
DOI:
10.1126/science.1260419
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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