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Arch Pediatr. 2015 Mar;22(3):300-2. doi: 10.1016/j.arcped.2014.12.007. Epub 2015 Jan 19.

Association of N-acetylcysteine and glucagon during percutaneous cholangiography in the treatment of inspissated bile syndrome.

Author information

1
Department of pediatrics, Rouen University Hospital, 76031 Rouen cedex, France.
2
Pediatric surgery, Rouen University Hospital, 76031 Rouen cedex, France.
3
Pediatric radiology, Rouen University Hospital, 76031 Rouen cedex, France.
4
Department of pediatrics, Rouen University Hospital, 76031 Rouen cedex, France. Electronic address: Olivier.Mouterde@chu-rouen.fr.

Abstract

Inspissated bile syndrome (IBS) is a rare neonatal disease. In the majority of cases, it resolves spontaneously and treatment is conservative. Follow-up is recommended with close monitoring of laboratory tests. When IBS does not resolve spontaneously, a catheter can be inserted into the gallbladder for cholangiography, which allows irrigation and drainage. Despite this treatment, some biliary tract obstruction may persist. We report on the case of a 3-month-old infant whose continuous biliary obstruction caused by IBS was successfully managed by interventional radiology with the association of N-acetylcysteine and glucagon. Even as first-line agents, these would allow more rapid clearance of gallstones and prevent infectious complications of indwelling catheters as well as decrease the need for surgery.

PMID:
25612875
DOI:
10.1016/j.arcped.2014.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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