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Stem Cells Int. 2014;2014:182737. doi: 10.1155/2014/182737. Epub 2014 Dec 9.

Maintenance and neuronal differentiation of chicken induced pluripotent stem-like cells.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, P.O. Box 3209, Durham, NC 27710, USA.
2
Department of Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, P.O. Box 3209, Durham, NC 27710, USA ; Instituto de Células Madres SUAGM, Sistema Universitario Ana G. Méndez, P.O. Box 21345, San Juan, PR 00928-1345, USA.
3
Max-Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin Brandenburg School for Regenerative Therapies, Hochbau 31.1, 13125 Berlin, Germany.
4
Department of Biology, Boston University, LSEB 406, Boston, MA 02215, USA.
5
Neurotransgenic Laboratory, Duke University Medical Center, P.O. Box 3209, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Abstract

Pluripotent stem cells have the potential to become any cell in the adult body, including neurons and glia. Avian stem cells could be used to study questions, like vocal learning, that would be difficult to examine with traditional mouse models. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are differentiated cells that have been reprogrammed to a pluripotent stem cell state, usually using inducing genes or other molecules. We recently succeeded in generating avian iPSC-like cells using mammalian genes, overcoming a limitation in the generation and use of iPSCs in nonmammalian species (Rosselló et al., 2013). However, there were no established optimal cell culture conditions for avian iPSCs to establish long-term cell lines and thus to study neuronal differentiation in vitro. Here we present an efficient method of maintaining chicken iPSC-like cells and for differentiating them into action potential generating neurons.

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