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BMC Fam Pract. 2015 Jan 22;16:5. doi: 10.1186/s12875-014-0216-3.

Modifiable risk factors associated with prediabetes in men and women: a cross-sectional analysis of the cohort study in primary health care on the evolution of patients with prediabetes (PREDAPS-Study).

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain. aliciadiazredondo@gmail.com.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, Public Health (History of Science), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. cvalle.giraldez@gmail.com.
3
La Victoria de Acentejo Health Centre, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Spain. lourdescarrillofernandez@gmail.com.
4
Martin de Vargas Health Centre, Madrid, Spain. rosarioserranom@gmail.com.
5
Porriño Health Centre, Pontevedra, Spain. javiersoidan@gmail.com.
6
Hereza Health Centre, Madrid, Spain. sara.artola@gmail.com.
7
Raval-Sud Primary Care Team, Barcelona, Spain. josep.franch@gmail.com.
8
Tafalla Health Centre, Navarra, Spain. javierdiezesp@ono.com.
9
Zumaia Health Centre, Guipúzcua, Spain. pezkurral@gmail.com.
10
Torrero-La Paz Health Centre, Zaragoza, Spain. jmmillaruelo@gmail.com.
11
Es Castell Basic Health Unit, Islas Baleares, Spain. mseguid5@gmail.com.
12
Torrero-La Paz Health Centre, Zaragoza, Spain. sangrosconte@telefonica.net.
13
Yecla Health Centre, Murcia, Spain. juanmartinezcandela@gmail.com.
14
Family & Community Medicine Teaching Unit, Cantabria, Spain. pedro.munoz@scsalud.es.
15
Endocrinology & Nutrition Department, Del Mar Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. 88565@parcdesalutmar.cat.
16
Department of Preventive Medicine, Public Health (History of Science), Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain. enriqueregidor@hotmail.com.
17
Consortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology & Public Health (CIBER en Epidemiología y Salud Pública - CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. enriqueregidor@hotmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Prediabetes is a high-risk state for diabetes development, but little is known about the factors associated with this state. The aim of the study was to identify modifiable risk factors associated with the presence of prediabetes in men and women.

METHODS:

Cohort Study in Primary Health Care on the Evolution of Patients with Prediabetes (PREDAPS-Study) is a prospective study on a cohort of 1184 subjects with prediabetes and another cohort of 838 subjects without glucose metabolism disorders. It is being conducted by 125 general practitioners in Spain. Data for this analysis were collected during the baseline stage in 2012. The modifiable risk factors included were: smoking habit, alcohol consumption, low physical activity, inadequate diet, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity. To assess independent association between each factor and prediabetes, odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

Abdominal obesity, low plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-cholesterol), and hypertension were independently associated with the presence of prediabetes in both men and women. After adjusting for all factors, the respective ORs (95% Confidence Intervals) were 1.98 (1.41-2.79), 1.88 (1.23-2.88) and 1.86 (1.39-2.51) for men, and 1.89 (1.36-2.62), 1.58 (1.12-2.23) and 1.44 (1.07-1.92) for women. Also, general obesity was a risk factor in both sexes but did not reach statistical significance among men, after adjusting for all factors. Risky alcohol consumption was a risk factor for prediabetes in men, OR 1.49 (1.00-2.24).

CONCLUSIONS:

Obesity, low HDL-cholesterol levels, and hypertension were modifiable risk factors independently related to the presence of prediabetes in both sexes. The magnitudes of the associations were stronger for men than women. Abdominal obesity in both men and women displayed the strongest association with prediabetes. The findings suggest that there are some differences between men and women, which should be taken into account when implementing specific recommendations to prevent or delay the onset of diabetes in adult population.

PMID:
25609029
PMCID:
PMC4316391
DOI:
10.1186/s12875-014-0216-3
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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