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PLoS One. 2015 Jan 21;10(1):e0115796. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0115796. eCollection 2015.

The European general practice research network presents the translations of its comprehensive definition of multimorbidity in family medicine in ten European languages.

Author information

1
Department of General Practice, Université de Bretagne occidentale, Brest, France.
2
Associazione Italiana Medici di Famiglia (AIMEF), Bologna, Italy.
3
Allgemein Medizin Hochschule Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.
4
Department of Family Doctor, University Nicolaus Copernicus, Torun, Poland.
5
Allgemein Medizin Hochschule Hannover, Hannover, Germany.
6
The Greek Association of General Practitioners (ELEGEIA), Thessaloniki, Greece.
7
University of Zagreb, School of Medicine, Andrija Stampar School of Public Health, Department of Family Medicine, Zagreb, Croatia.
8
Department of General Practice, University of Plovdiv, Plovdiv, Bulgaria.
9
Department of General Practice, University of Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia.
10
IDIAP Jordi Gol, Unitat de Support a La Recerca, Barcelona, Spain.
11
Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmo, Sweden.
12
Department of English, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland.
13
Department of General Practice, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Nederland.
14
Department of Public Health, Université de Bretagne occidentale, Brest, France.
15
Department of Primary and Interdisciplinary Care, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiteit Antwerpen, Antwerpen, Belgium.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Multimorbidity, according to the World Health Organization, exists when there are two or more chronic conditions in one patient. This definition seems inaccurate for the holistic approach to Family Medicine (FM) and long-term care. To avoid this pitfall the European General Practitioners Research Network (EGPRN) designed a comprehensive definition of multimorbidity using a systematic literature review.

OBJECTIVE:

To translate that English definition into European languages and to validate the semantic, conceptual and cultural homogeneity of the translations for further research.

METHOD:

Forward translation of the EGPRN's definition of multimorbidity followed by a Delphi consensus procedure assessment, a backward translation and a cultural check with all teams to ensure the homogeneity of the translations in their national context. Consensus was defined as 70% of the scores being higher than 6. Delphi rounds were repeated in each country until a consensus was reached.

RESULTS:

229 European medical expert FPs participated in the study. Ten consensual translations of the EGPRN comprehensive definition of multimorbidity were achieved.

CONCLUSION:

A comprehensive definition of multimorbidity is now available in English and ten European languages for further collaborative research in FM and long-term care.

PMID:
25607642
PMCID:
PMC4301631
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0115796
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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