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Nat Commun. 2015 Jan 21;6:6080. doi: 10.1038/ncomms7080.

Imperceptible magnetoelectronics.

Author information

1
Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW Dresden), Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden, Germany.
2
1] Electrical and Electronic Engineering and Information Systems, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan [2] Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032, Japan.
3
1] Electrical and Electronic Engineering and Information Systems, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656, Japan [2] Exploratory Research for Advanced Technology (ERATO), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032, Japan [3] The Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research (ISIR), Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047, Japan.
4
1] Institute for Integrative Nanosciences, Institute for Solid State and Materials Research (IFW Dresden), Helmholtzstrasse 20, 01069 Dresden, Germany [2] Material Systems for Nanoelectronics, Chemnitz University of Technology, Reichenhainer Strasse 70, 09107 Chemnitz, Germany [3] Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, Dresden University of Technology, Helmholtzstrasse 10, 01062 Dresden, Germany.

Abstract

Future electronic skin aims to mimic nature's original both in functionality and appearance. Although some of the multifaceted properties of human skin may remain exclusive to the biological system, electronics opens a unique path that leads beyond imitation and could equip us with unfamiliar senses. Here we demonstrate giant magnetoresistive sensor foils with high sensitivity, unmatched flexibility and mechanical endurance. They are <2 μm thick, extremely flexible (bending radii <3 μm), lightweight (≈3 g m(-2)) and wearable as imperceptible magneto-sensitive skin that enables proximity detection, navigation and touchless control. On elastomeric supports, they can be stretched uniaxially or biaxially, reaching strains of >270% and endure over 1,000 cycles without fatigue. These ultrathin magnetic field sensors readily conform to ubiquitous objects including human skin and offer a new sense for soft robotics, safety and healthcare monitoring, consumer electronics and electronic skin devices.

PMID:
25607534
PMCID:
PMC4354162
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms7080
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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