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BMC Public Health. 2015 Jan 21;15:21. doi: 10.1186/s12889-015-1347-8.

Randomized controlled trial of a minimal versus extended Internet-based intervention for problem drinkers: study protocol.

Author information

1
Department of Social and Epidemiological Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada. john.cunningham@anu.edu.au.
2
National Institute for Mental Health Research, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia. john.cunningham@anu.edu.au.
3
Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada. christian.hendershot@camh.ca.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. christian.hendershot@camh.ca.
5
Department of Social and Epidemiological Research, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, Canada. jtrehm@gmail.com.
6
Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. jtrehm@gmail.com.
7
Dalla Lana School of Population Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. jtrehm@gmail.com.
8
Technische Universit├Ąt, Dresden, Germany. jtrehm@gmail.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Problem drinking causes great harm to the person and to society. Most problem drinkers will never seek treatment. The current trial will test the efficacy of two Internet interventions for problem drinking - one minimal and the other extended - as an alternate means of providing help to those in need.

METHODS/DESIGN:

A double blinded, four-wave panel design with random assignment to two experimental conditions will be used in this study. Participants will be recruited through a comprehensive recruitment strategy consisting of online and print advertisements asking for people who are 'interested in helping us develop and evaluate Internet-based interventions for problem drinkers.' Potential participants will be screened to select problem drinkers who have home access to the Internet. Participants will be sent to a password-protected Internet site and, upon signing in, will be randomized to be provided access to the minimal or extended Internet-based intervention. Six-month, twelve-month, and two-year drinking outcomes will be compared between experimental conditions. The primary hypothesis is that participants in the extended Internet intervention condition will display significantly improved drinking outcomes at twelve months compared to participants in the minimal intervention.

DISCUSSION:

The findings of this trial will contribute to the growing literature on Internet interventions for problem drinkers. In addition, findings from this trial will contribute to the scarce literature available evaluating the long-term efficacy of brief interventions for alcohol problems.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

Clinical Trials.gov # NCT01874509; First submitted June 17, 2013.

PMID:
25604206
PMCID:
PMC4308920
DOI:
10.1186/s12889-015-1347-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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