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Mucosal Immunol. 2015 Sep;8(5):1021-1030. doi: 10.1038/mi.2014.129. Epub 2015 Jan 21.

The Axl receptor tyrosine kinase is a discriminator of macrophage function in the inflamed lung.

Author information

1
Manchester Collaborative Centre for Inflammation Research, Manchester University, Core Technology Facility, 46 Grafton Street, Manchester. M13 9NT, UK.
2
University of Manchester NIHR Translational Research Facility, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University Hospital of South Manchester Foundation Trust, Manchester M23 9LT, U.K.
3
AstraZeneca R&D Mölndal, Pepparedsleden 1, Mölndal, SE-431 83, Sweden.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

Much of the biology surrounding macrophage functional specificity has arisen through examining inflammation-induced polarizing signals, but this also occurs in homeostasis, requiring tissue-specific environmental triggers that influence macrophage phenotype and function. The TAM receptor family of receptor tyrosine kinases (Tyro3, Axl and MerTK) mediates the non-inflammatory removal of apoptotic cells by phagocytes through the bridging phosphatidylserine-binding molecules growth arrest-specific 6 (Gas6) or Protein S. We show that one such TAM receptor (Axl) is exclusively expressed on mouse airway macrophages, but not interstitial macrophages and other lung leukocytes, under homeostatic conditions and is constitutively ligated to Gas6. Axl expression is potently induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor expressed in the healthy and inflamed airway, and by type I interferon or Toll-like receptor-3 stimulation on human and mouse macrophages, indicating potential involvement of Axl in apoptotic cell removal under inflammatory conditions. Indeed, an absence of Axl does not cause sterile inflammation in health, but leads to exaggerated lung inflammatory disease upon influenza infection. These data imply that Axl allows specific identification of airway macrophages, and that its expression is critical for macrophage functional compartmentalization in the airspaces or lung interstitium. We propose that this may be a critical feature to prevent excessive inflammation because of secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells that have not been cleared by efferocytosis.

PMID:
25603826
PMCID:
PMC4430298
DOI:
10.1038/mi.2014.129
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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