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Schizophr Res. 2015 Mar;162(1-3):86-9. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2014.12.039. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Increased postural sway predicts negative symptom progression in youth at ultrahigh risk for psychosis.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA; Center for Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA. Electronic address: derek.dean@colorado.edu.
2
Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA; Minneapolis VA Health Care System, Minneapolis, MN, USA.
3
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA.
4
Institute for Cognitive Science, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA.
5
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA; Center for Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA.

Abstract

Impaired ability to maintain an upright posture may reflect impairment in the cerebellum, a critical structure for the fluid coordination of neural information, thought to be disrupted in psychosis. The current study utilized an instrumental measure of posture in individuals at ultrahigh risk (UHR) for psychosis (n=43) and healthy controls (n=44). Positive and negative symptoms were assessed twice over 12months. Results showed that increased postural sway in the UHR group predicted changes in negative symptoms. This study provides an important prospective view on the relationship between cerebellar-sensitive behavior and integral symptoms, which until now has received limited biomarker research.

KEYWORDS:

Cerebellum; Cognitive dysmetria; Postural sway; Psychosis; Ultrahigh risk

PMID:
25601361
PMCID:
PMC4339540
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2014.12.039
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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