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Nature. 2015 Mar 26;519(7544):460-3. doi: 10.1038/nature14030. Epub 2015 Jan 19.

A temporal shift in the circuits mediating retrieval of fear memory.

Author information

1
1] Department of Psychiatry, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, PO Box 365067, San Juan 00936, Puerto Rico [2] Department of Anatomy &Neurobiology, University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine, P.O. Box 365067, San Juan 00936, Puerto Rico.

Abstract

Fear memories allow animals to avoid danger, thereby increasing their chances of survival. Fear memories can be retrieved long after learning, but little is known about how retrieval circuits change with time. Here we show that the dorsal midline thalamus of rats is required for the retrieval of auditory conditioned fear at late (24 hours, 7 days, 28 days), but not early (0.5 hours, 6 hours) time points after learning. Consistent with this, the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (PVT), a subregion of the dorsal midline thalamus, showed increased c-Fos expression only at late time points, indicating that the PVT is gradually recruited for fear retrieval. Accordingly, the conditioned tone responses of PVT neurons increased with time after training. The prelimbic (PL) prefrontal cortex, which is necessary for fear retrieval, sends dense projections to the PVT. Retrieval at late time points activated PL neurons projecting to the PVT, and optogenetic silencing of these projections impaired retrieval at late, but not early, time points. In contrast, silencing of PL inputs to the basolateral amygdala impaired retrieval at early, but not late, time points, indicating a time-dependent shift in retrieval circuits. Retrieval at late time points also activated PVT neurons projecting to the central nucleus of the amygdala, and silencing these projections at late, but not early, time points induced a persistent attenuation of fear. Thus, the PVT may act as a crucial thalamic node recruited into cortico-amygdalar networks for retrieval and maintenance of long-term fear memories.

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PMID:
25600268
PMCID:
PMC4376623
DOI:
10.1038/nature14030
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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