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Mar Pollut Bull. 2015 Mar 15;92(1-2):105-112. doi: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.12.049. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Mercury distribution, methylation and volatilization in microcosms with and without the sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum.

Author information

1
Departamento de Geoquímica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro de São João Batista s/n, Instituto de Química, 5° andar, Centro, Niterói, RJ 24020-141, Brazil. Electronic address: nafisarizzini@yahoo.com.
2
Instituto de Biofísica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Bloco G/CCS/Ilha do Fundão, RJ 21941-902, Brazil. Electronic address: raquelrose10@gmail.com.
3
Faculdade de Oceanografia, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, São Francisco Xavier St. 524, 4018E, Maracanã, RJ 20550-013, Brazil. Electronic address: hallfz@uerj.br.
4
Departamento de Geoquímica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro de São João Batista s/n, Instituto de Química, 5° andar, Centro, Niterói, RJ 24020-141, Brazil. Electronic address: rccordeiro@geoq.uff.br.
5
Instituto de Biofísica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Bloco G/CCS/Ilha do Fundão, RJ 21941-902, Brazil. Electronic address: jeanrdg@biof.ufrj.br.

Abstract

Mercury (Hg) has a complex biogeochemical cycle in aquatic environments. Its most toxic form, methylmercury (MeHg), is produced by microorganisms. This study investigated how the sea anemone Bunodosoma caissarum affects Hg distribution, methylation and volatilization in laboratory model systems. (203)Hg was added to microcosms and its distribution in seawater, specimens and air was periodically measured by gamma spectrometry. MeHg was measured by liquid scintillation. After the uptake period, specimens had a bioconcentration factor of 70 and in microcosms with and without B. caissarum, respectively 0.05% and 0.32% of the initial spike was found as MeHg. After depuration, MeHg in specimens ranged from 0.2% to 2.4% of total Hg. Microcosms with B. caissarum had higher Hg volatilization (58%) than controls (17%), possibly due to Hg(2+) reduction mediated by microorganisms associated with its tissues and mucus secretions. Marine organisms and their associated microbiota may play a role in Hg and MeHg cycling.

KEYWORDS:

Bioaccumulation; Biomonitor; Cnidaria; Methylmercury; Seawater

PMID:
25599628
DOI:
10.1016/j.marpolbul.2014.12.049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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