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Altern Ther Health Med. 2015 Jan-Feb;21(1):8-14.

Feldenkrais method-based exercise improves quality of life in individuals with Parkinson's disease: a controlled, randomized clinical trial.

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Longevity results in changes to patterns of health, with an increased prevalence of chronic diseases. Parkinson's disease (PD) is described as a progressive neurodegenerative disease related to age that influences quality of life (QoL) and leads to depression.

OBJECTIVE:

The study intended to assess changes in QoL and depression in older adults with PD through use of Feldenkrais method-based exercise.

DESIGN:

The study was a controlled, blinded, and randomized clinical trial.

SETTING:

The study occurred at the University Hospital of the Federal University of Sergipe in Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil.

PARTICIPANTS:

Participants were 30 patients, aged between 50 and 70 y, with idiopathic PD, who signed an informed consent form and were randomly assigned to 2 groups: treatment and control.

INTERVENTION:

The treatment group underwent 50 sessions of an exercise program based on the Feldenkrais method. The control group received educational lectures during this period. The treatment group's 50 sessions, given 2 ×/wk on alternate days and lasting 60 min, were conducted in an appropriate room at the hospital.

OUTCOME MEASURES:

Two surveys, the Parkinson's Disease Quality of Life (PDQL) questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), were administered before and after the sessions for both groups.

RESULTS:

After the exercises based on the Feldenkrais method, the treated group showed improvement in QoL scores (P = .004) as well as a reduction in the level of depression (P = .05) compared with the control group.

CONCLUSION:

The findings in the current study indicate that it is likely that the practice of a program based on the Feldenkrais method can contribute greatly to the QoL of patients with PD, suggesting the importance of interventions that promote wellness for this population.

PMID:
25599428
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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