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J Pediatr Surg. 2015 Jan;50(1):192-200. doi: 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2014.11.028. Epub 2014 Nov 12.

Prevention of infectious complications after elective colorectal surgery in children: an American Pediatric Surgical Association Outcomes and Clinical Trials Committee comprehensive review.

Author information

1
Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: shawn.rangel@childrens.harvard.edu.
2
University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, USA.
3
Children's Mercy Hospital, University of Missouri, Kansas City, MO, USA.
4
Seattle Children's Hospital, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
5
Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.
6
University of Louisville, Louisville, KY, USA.
7
St. Louis Children's Hospital, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA.
8
Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA.
9
Montreal Children's Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada.
10
Cincinnati Children's Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA.
11
Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital, University of Texas, Houston, TX, USA.
12
Children's Medical Center, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.
13
Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY, USA.
14
Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This goal of this review was to examine the clinical evidence in support of commonly utilized measures intended to reduce complications following elective colorectal surgery.

DATA SOURCE:

Literature searches were performed to identify relevant studies from Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane databases.

STUDY SELECTION:

The American Pediatric Surgery Association Outcomes and Clinical Trials Committee selected eight questions to address this topic systematically in the context of three management areas: 1) appropriate utilization of systemic antibiotics for colorectal procedures, 2) reduction of stool burden through mechanical bowel preparation, and 3) intraluminal gut decontamination through use of enteral nonabsorbable antibiotics. Primary outcomes of interest included the occurrence of infectious and mechanical complications related to stool burden and intraluminal bacterial concentration (incisional surgical site infection, anastomotic leakage, and intraabdominal abscess).

RESULTS:

The evidence in support of each management category was systematically reviewed, graded, and summarized in the context of the review's primary outcomes. Practice recommendations were made as deemed appropriate by the committee.

CONCLUSIONS:

Clinical evidence in support of interventions to reduce infectious complications following colorectal surgery is derived almost exclusively from the adult literature. High-quality evidence to guide clinical practice in children is sorely needed, as the available data may have only limited relevance to pediatric colorectal diseases.

KEYWORDS:

Anastomotic leakage; Antibiotic prophylaxis; Colorectal surgery; Deep-space infection; Infection control and prevention; Intra-abdominal abscess; Mechanical bowel preparation; Surgical site infection; Wound infection

PMID:
25598122
DOI:
10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2014.11.028
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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