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J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2015 Apr;353(1):9-16. doi: 10.1124/jpet.114.220277. Epub 2015 Jan 16.

Pine bark extracts: nutraceutical, pharmacological, and toxicological evaluation.

Author information

1
Department of Regenerative Medicine (Y.-Y.L., J.F., X.-L.Z., Y.-Y.C.), Key Laboratory of Arrhythmias of the Ministry of Education of China (Y.-Y.C.), and Institute of Medical Genetics (Y.-Y.C.), Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
2
Department of Regenerative Medicine (Y.-Y.L., J.F., X.-L.Z., Y.-Y.C.), Key Laboratory of Arrhythmias of the Ministry of Education of China (Y.-Y.C.), and Institute of Medical Genetics (Y.-Y.C.), Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China yycui@tongji.edu.cn.

Abstract

Proanthocyanidins are among the most abundant constituents in pine bark extracts (PBEs). This review summarizes medical research on PBEs from Pinus pinaster, Pinus radiata, Pinus massoniana, and other less well characterized species. The precise mechanisms of the important physiologic functions of PBE components remain to be elucidated, but there is evidently great potential for the identification and development of novel antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cardiovascular, neuroprotective, and anticancer medicines. Although toxicological data for PBEs are limited, no serious adverse effects have been reported. PBEs, therefore, may have potential as nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals and should be safe for use as food ingredients.

PMID:
25597308
DOI:
10.1124/jpet.114.220277
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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