Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Trends Neurosci. 2015 Mar;38(3):139-44. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2014.12.004. Epub 2015 Jan 12.

Manipulating cell fate in the cochlea: a feasible therapy for hearing loss.

Author information

1
Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Department of Physiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Eaton-Peabody Laboratory, Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, MA, USA; Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address: albert_edge@meei.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Mammalian auditory hair cells do not spontaneously regenerate, unlike hair cells in lower vertebrates, including fish and birds. In mammals, hearing loss due to the loss of hair cells is permanent and intractable. Recent studies in the mouse have demonstrated spontaneous hair cell regeneration during a short postnatal period, but this regenerative capacity is lost in the adult cochlea. Reduced regeneration coincides with a transition that results in a decreased pool of progenitor cells in the cochlear sensory epithelium. Here, we review the signaling cascades involved in hair cell formation and morphogenesis of the organ of Corti in developing mammals, the changing status of progenitor cells in the cochlea, and the regeneration of auditory hair cells in adult mammals.

KEYWORDS:

cell replacement; hair cells; hearing loss; sensory systems

PMID:
25593106
PMCID:
PMC4352405
DOI:
10.1016/j.tins.2014.12.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center