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Int J Med Microbiol. 2015 Feb;305(2):224-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ijmm.2014.12.020. Epub 2014 Dec 24.

The conjugative DNA-transfer apparatus of Streptomyces.

Author information

1
Interfakultäres Institut für Mikrobiologie und Infektionsmedizin Tübingen IMIT, Mikrobiologie/Biotechnologie, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 28, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.
2
Interfakultäres Institut für Mikrobiologie und Infektionsmedizin Tübingen IMIT, Mikrobiologie/Biotechnologie, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 28, 72076 Tübingen, Germany. Electronic address: gmuth@biotech.uni-tuebingen.de.

Abstract

Conjugation is a major route of horizontal gene transfer, an important driving force in the evolution of bacterial genomes. Since antibiotic producing streptomycetes represent a natural reservoir of antibiotic resistance genes, the Streptomyces conjugation system might have a particular role in the dissemination of the resistance genes. Streptomycetes transfer DNA in a unique process, clearly distinguished from the well-known DNA-transfer by type IV secretion systems. A single plasmid-encoded DNA-translocase, TraB, transfers a double-stranded DNA-molecule to the recipient. Elucidation of the structure, pore forming ability and DNA binding characteristics of TraB indicated that the TraB conjugation system is derived from an FtsK-like ancestor protein suggesting that Streptomyces adapted the FtsK/SpoIIIE chromosome segregation system to transfer DNA between two distinct Streptomyces cells. Following the primary transfer, a multi-protein DNA-translocation apparatus consisting of TraB and several Spd-proteins spreads the newly transferred DNA to the neighbouring mycelial compartments resulting in the rapid colonization of the recipient mycelium by the donor DNA.

KEYWORDS:

Conjugation; FtsK/SpoIIIE; Plasmid transfer; TraB; Type IV secretion

PMID:
25592263
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijmm.2014.12.020
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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