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J Biomed Sci. 2015 Jan 16;22:6. doi: 10.1186/s12929-014-0110-2.

Biological roles of CCAAT/Enhancer-binding protein delta during inflammation.

Ko CY1,2, Chang WC3, Wang JM4,5,6,7.

Author information

1
Program for Neural Regenerative Medicine, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 11031, Taiwan. ko680108@tmu.edu.tw.
2
Center for Neurotrauma and Neuroregeneration, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 11031, Taiwan. ko680108@tmu.edu.tw.
3
Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 11031, Taiwan. wcchang@tmu.edu.tw.
4
Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 11031, Taiwan. yumingw@mail.ncku.edu.tw.
5
Institute of Bioinformatics and Biosignal Transduction, College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101, Taiwan. yumingw@mail.ncku.edu.tw.
6
Infectious Disease and Signaling Research Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101, Taiwan. yumingw@mail.ncku.edu.tw.
7
Center of Molecular Inflammation, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, 70101, Taiwan. yumingw@mail.ncku.edu.tw.

Abstract

CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta (CEBPD) belongs to the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein family, and these proteins function as transcription factors in many biological processes, including cell differentiation, motility, growth arrest, proliferation, cell death, metabolism and immune responses. The functional diversity of CEBPD depends, in part, on the cell type and cellular context, which indicates that CEBPD could interpret a variety of cues to adjust cellular responses in specific situations. Here, we review the regulation of the CEBPD gene and its function in response to inflammatory stimuli. We also address its effects in inflammation-related diseases through a discussion of its recently discovered downstream targets. Regarding to the previous discoveries and new insights in inflammation-associated diseases, suggesting CEBPD could also be a central gene in inflammation. Importantly, the results of this study indicate that the investigation of CEBPD could open a new avenue to help better understand the inflammatory response.

PMID:
25591788
PMCID:
PMC4318212
DOI:
10.1186/s12929-014-0110-2
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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