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J Neurosci. 2015 Jan 14;35(2):843-52. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2170-14.2015.

Structure-function relationships between aldolase C/zebrin II expression and complex spike synchrony in the cerebellum.

Author information

1
Department of Neurophysiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan.
2
Department of Cellular Neurobiology, Brain Research Institute, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8585, Japan.
3
Department of Anatomy, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-8638, Japan, and.
4
Department of Neurophysiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan, kitamurak@yamanashi.ac.jp mkano-tky@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp.
5
Department of Neurophysiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan, PRESTO, JST, Saitama 332-0012, Japan kitamurak@yamanashi.ac.jp mkano-tky@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp.

Abstract

Simple and regular anatomical structure is a hallmark of the cerebellar cortex. Parasagittally arrayed alternate expression of aldolase C/zebrin II in Purkinje cells (PCs) has been extensively studied, but surprisingly little is known about its functional significance. Here we found a precise structure-function relationship between aldolase C expression and synchrony of PC complex spike activities that reflect climbing fiber inputs to PCs. We performed two-photon calcium imaging in transgenic mice in which aldolase C compartments can be visualized in vivo, and identified highly synchronous complex spike activities among aldolase C-positive or aldolase C-negative PCs, but not across these populations. The boundary of aldolase C compartments corresponded to that of complex spike synchrony at single-cell resolution. Sensory stimulation evoked aldolase C compartment-specific complex spike responses and synchrony. This result further revealed the structure-function segregation. In awake animals, complex spike synchrony both within and between PC populations across the aldolase C boundary were enhanced in response to sensory stimuli, in a way that two functionally distinct PC ensembles are coactivated. These results suggest that PC populations characterized by aldolase C expression precisely represent distinct functional units of the cerebellar cortex, and these functional units can cooperate to process sensory information in awake animals.

KEYWORDS:

Purkinje cell; climbing fiber; microzone; zone

PMID:
25589776
PMCID:
PMC6605375
DOI:
10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2170-14.2015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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