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Semin Fetal Neonatal Med. 2015 Feb;20(1):52-57. doi: 10.1016/j.siny.2014.12.003. Epub 2015 Jan 10.

Impact of bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction on neurodevelopmental outcomes.

Author information

1
Division of Child Neurology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA. Electronic address: wusthoff@stanford.edu.
2
Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USA.

Abstract

Bilirubin-induced neurologic dysfunction (BIND) is the constellation of neurologic sequelae following milder degrees of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia than are associated with kernicterus. Clinically, BIND may manifest after the neonatal period as developmental delay, cognitive impairment, disordered executive function, and behavioral and psychiatric disorders. However, there is controversy regarding the relative contribution of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia versus other risk factors to the development of later neurodevelopmental disorders in children with BIND. In this review, we focus on the empiric data from the past 25 years regarding neurodevelopmental outcomes and BIND, including specific effects on developmental delay, cognition, speech and language development, executive function, and the neurobehavioral disorders, such as attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and autism.

KEYWORDS:

Cognition; Developmental disabilities; Hyperbilirubinemia; Neonate; Outcomes

PMID:
25585889
PMCID:
PMC4651619
DOI:
10.1016/j.siny.2014.12.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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