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J Biol Chem. 2015 Feb 27;290(9):5855-67. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M114.607911. Epub 2015 Jan 12.

A hypertrophic cardiomyopathy-associated MYBPC3 mutation common in populations of South Asian descent causes contractile dysfunction.

Author information

1
From the Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, Health Sciences Division, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois 60153, and.
2
the Department of Microbiology and.
3
the Department of Microbiology and the Cell, Molecular, and Structural Biology Program, Miami University, Oxford, Ohio 45056.
4
From the Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, Health Sciences Division, Loyola University Chicago, Maywood, Illinois 60153, and ssadayappan@luc.edu.

Abstract

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) results from mutations in genes encoding sarcomeric proteins, most often MYBPC3, which encodes cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C). A recently discovered HCM-associated 25-base pair deletion in MYBPC3 is inherited in millions worldwide. Although this mutation causes changes in the C10 domain of cMyBP-C (cMyBP-C(C10mut)), which binds to the light meromyosin (LMM) region of the myosin heavy chain, the underlying molecular mechanism causing HCM is unknown. In this study, adenoviral expression of cMyBP-C(C10mut) in cultured adult rat cardiomyocytes was used to investigate protein localization and evaluate contractile function and Ca(2+) transients, compared with wild-type cMyBP-C expression (cMyBP-C(WT)) and controls. Forty-eight hours after infection, 44% of cMyBP-C(WT) and 36% of cMyBP-C(C10mut) protein levels were determined in total lysates, confirming equal expression. Immunofluorescence experiments showed little or no localization of cMyBP-C(C10mut) to the C-zone, whereas cMyBP-C(WT) mostly showed C-zone staining, suggesting that cMyBP-C(C10mut) could not properly integrate in the C-zone of the sarcomere. Subcellular fractionation confirmed that most cMyBP-C(C10mut) resided in the soluble fraction, with reduced presence in the myofilament fraction. Also, cMyBP-C(C10mut) displayed significantly reduced fractional shortening, sarcomere shortening, and relaxation velocities, apparently caused by defects in sarcomere function, because Ca(2+) transients were unaffected. Co-sedimentation and protein cross-linking assays confirmed that C10(mut) causes the loss of C10 domain interaction with myosin LMM. Protein homology modeling studies showed significant structural perturbation in cMyBP-C(C10mut), providing a potential structural basis for the alteration in its mode of interaction with myosin LMM. Therefore, expression of cMyBP-C(C10mut) protein is sufficient to cause contractile dysfunction in vitro.

KEYWORDS:

Cardiomyopathy; Contractile Protein; Genetic Polymorphism; Heart Failure; Muscle Physiology

PMID:
25583989
PMCID:
PMC4342493
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M114.607911
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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