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Jpn J Clin Oncol. 2015 Mar;45(3):307-10. doi: 10.1093/jjco/hyu218. Epub 2015 Jan 12.

Relationship between smoking and multiple colorectal cancers in patients with Japanese Lynch syndrome: a cross-sectional study conducted by the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Iwakuni Clinical Center, Iwakuni.
2
Division of Clinical Genome Research, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo.
3
Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo.
4
Department of Surgery 1, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu.
5
Department of Surgery, Hyogo Medical University, Nishinomiya.
6
Major in Science, Graduate School of Science and Engineering Research, Kinki University, Higashiosaka.
7
Oncogene Research Unit/Cancer Prevention Unit, Tochigi Cancer Center, Utsunomiya.
8
Department of Clinical Oncology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai.
9
Genetics Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo.
10
Department of Digestive Tract and General Surgery, Saitama Medical Center, Saitama Medical University, Kawagoe 05hishi@saitama-med.ac.jp.
11
Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo.
12
Department of Surgical Oncology, Graduate School, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

The positive correlation between smoking and cancer risk is well estimated in sporadic colorectal cancer, whereas little is known with regard to Lynch syndrome-associated colorectal cancer. A total of 118 familial colorectal cancer patients from the Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer Registry and Genetic Testing Project of the Japanese Society for Cancer of the Colon and Rectum, were assessed to determine whether smoking alters the incidence of multiple colorectal cancers. In male patients with Lynch syndrome (n = 29), the incidence of multiple colorectal cancers in patients who had ever smoked (smoking duration: median of 19 years) was higher than that in those who never smoked (58.8% vs. 10.0%, P = 0.02). The cumulative risk for metachronous colorectal cancer was significantly higher in male Lynch syndrome patients who had previously smoked than in those who had never smoked (P = 0.03). Our data suggest that long-term cigarette smoking might be a strong risk factor for the development of multiple colorectal cancers in male Lynch syndrome patients.

KEYWORDS:

Lynch syndrome; colorectal cancer; male; multiple cancer; smoking

PMID:
25583420
DOI:
10.1093/jjco/hyu218
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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