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J Clin Periodontol. 2015 Feb;42(2):113-20. doi: 10.1111/jcpe.12361. Epub 2015 Jan 29.

Associations between the number of natural teeth and metabolic syndrome in adults.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.

Abstract

AIM:

To explore associations between the number of natural teeth and metabolic syndrome in adults.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Cross-sectional data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2008 were used. Eligible adults (n = 5511) were classified into four groups by their number of natural teeth (excluding third molars): full dentition, 21-27 teeth, 1-20 teeth, or edentulous. Metabolic syndrome was defined by diagnostic guidelines from the American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Associations were analysed by survey logistic regression. Biometric and metabolic parameters in different dentition groups were compared.

RESULTS:

Adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, ratio of family income to poverty, physical activity, smoking, and energy intake, tooth loss was significantly associated with metabolic syndrome (p = 0.002). Compared to participants with full dentition, the odds were 32% higher in those with 21-27 teeth, 55% higher in those with 1-20 teeth and 79% higher in edentulous participants. The number of natural teeth was inversely associated with body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose and insulin concentrations (p < 0.01 for all); it was positively associated with serum HDL cholesterol concentration (p = 0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

The number of natural teeth is inversely associated with the presence of metabolic syndrome in adults.

KEYWORDS:

dentition; epidemiology; metabolic syndrome; oral health; tooth loss

PMID:
25581485
DOI:
10.1111/jcpe.12361
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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